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Porter Road Butcher

Porter Road Butcher is a neighborhood shop that supplies Nashville with great fresh local meats and products in the heart of beautiful East Nashville.

Porter Road Butcher

Porter Road Butcher is a neighborhood shop that supplies Nashville with great fresh local meats and products in the heart of beautiful East Nashville.

Porter Road Butcher is a neighborhood shop that supplies Nashville with great fresh local meats and products in the heart of beautiful East Nashville­.

theshop­@prbutcher­.com

(615) 650-4440

501 Gallatin Avenue, Nashville, TN 37206

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Porter Road Butcher is neighborhood butcher shop

Food and Beverage

Not valid with any other offer.

Porter Road Butcher

615-650-4440

501 Gallatin Ave, Nashville, TN

Your Neighborhood Butcher Shop

Porter Road Butcher is a neighborhood shop that supplys Nashville with great fresh local meats and products in the heart of beautiful East Nashville.

Gourmet Foods

Not valid with any other offer.

Porter Road Butcher

615-650-4440

501 Gallatin Avenue, Nashville, TN

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All of our pigs are raised for us locally. We pick them up two days after being slaughtered and process them that day. We serve the freshest most delicious pork products around. We cut fresh pork Chops, Boneless Loin and Tenderloin to order as thick as you like. For BBQ we cut Boston Butts, Spare Ribs, and St. Louis Style Ribs. But never baby backs, we save those for the chops. We also keep around some odds and ends for the more adventurous crowd. The rest of the pig we process into bacon, fresh sausages, and other deliciously porky products.

All of our pigs are raised for us locally. We pick them up two days after being slaughtered and process them that day. We serve the freshest most delicious pork products around. We cut fresh pork Chops, Boneless Loin and Tenderloin to order as thick as you like. For BBQ we cut Boston Butts, Spare Ribs, and St. Louis Style Ribs. But never baby backs, we save those for the chops. We also keep around some odds and ends for the more adventurous crowd. The rest of the pig we process into bacon, fresh sausages, and other deliciously porky products.

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Our chickens are raised locally and therefore come in to the shop extremely fresh. We keep our chickens in the cooler to make sure they remain as fresh as possible. To further ensure their deliciousness, our chickens are not butchered until they are ordered. Chicken Breasts, Legs, Wings, and Thighs are all cut to order for each customer. We also offer whole chickens that you can take home and cut up however your heart desires!

Our chickens are raised locally and therefore come in to the shop extremely fresh. We keep our chickens in the cooler to make sure they remain as fresh as possible. To further ensure their deliciousness, our chickens are not butchered until they are ordered. Chicken Breasts, Legs, Wings, and Thighs are all cut to order for each customer. We also offer whole chickens that you can take home and cut up however your heart desires!

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Our cows are locally-raised and come into the shop in full sides after dry aging a minimum of fourteen days. We process the cows three times a week to insure the freshest products to our customers. When available we offer cut to order Bone-In Ribeyes, Bone-In Strips, Tenderloin, Sirloin and a variety of other beautiful Butcher Steaks. We also offer T-Bones and Porterhouses but by pre-order only. But we strive to use every piece of the cow. We also get a variety of roasting and braising meats; Top, Bottom, and Eye of Round, Sirloin Tip, Chuck, Short Ribs, Shanks. We offer great BBQ items from our cows to like Brisket or Texas Style Ribs. The trim from the whole dry aged cow becomes our ground beef that we grind fresh daily. Our Bones are also available at the shop for stocks or you can just grab one of our rich pre-made stocks. We can get any cut you need if it comes from a cow, sometime we may just need some time.

Our cows are locally-raised and come into the shop in full sides after dry aging a minimum of fourteen days. We process the cows three times a week to insure the freshest products to our customers. When available we offer cut to order Bone-In Ribeyes, Bone-In Strips, Tenderloin, Sirloin and a variety of other beautiful Butcher Steaks. We also offer T-Bones and Porterhouses but by pre-order only. But we strive to use every piece of the cow. We also get a variety of roasting and braising meats; Top, Bottom, and Eye of Round, Sirloin Tip, Chuck, Short Ribs, Shanks. We offer great BBQ items from our cows to like Brisket or Texas Style Ribs. The trim from the whole dry aged cow becomes our ground beef that we grind fresh daily. Our Bones are also available at the shop for stocks or you can just grab one of our rich pre-made stocks. We can get any cut you need if it comes from a cow, sometime we may just need some time.

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We serve local grass fed meats and other fine local products.

We serve local grass fed meats and other fine local products.

Details

Soaps and Steaks to Save the World.

An item that we use each and every day, probably four or more times per day, soap is something that as Americans we couldn’t imagine living our lives without, but most likely have no idea where it originated.

Because I mean, you just can’t say with all honesty that you envision cave men using a bar of soap to cleanse their loincloths (I know, I know- sorry Geico). Nor can you confidently claim that your great, great, grandmother went to the corner Walgreens to pick up a bottle of Dove Body Wash—pomegranate & lemon verbena scent, of course—when she needed a little scrub in the tub.

No, soap wasn’t one of God’s great creations, but it instead came about (like most great inventions) by accident.

A Brief History of Soap

*As told to PRB by Kathleen Souder, co-owner of Rainwater Farm, who would like it to be noted that she is not an official Soap Historian.

- Most simply, soap is a mixture of lye and fat, which once mixed together, create a chemical reaction that turns the two into a solidified mixture.

- Thousands of years ago when man treated the slaughter of an animal as a ceremonial sacrifice, they would perform the ceremony on top of a hill. That way the rain and gravity would wash away any of their leftover mess, including the ash from the fire and the unnecessary fat.

- Lye, one of the two main components to making soap, can be derived from leaching the ashes of a fire (very simply, mixing them with water).

- So when the rain did come, and the ash and fats were washed down, and the alkaline properties of the lye (from the ash) mixed with the discarded animal fat, that mixture ultimately ran off into the stream.

- Soon people realized that, in the wake of the animal sacrifices, their clothes would get cleaner in the river. Eventually the connection was made: ash + water + fat = clean.

So while large-scale companies like Johnson & Johnson, for example, have simplified the matter for consumers, mass-producing soaps of all different kinds and smells—oh glory!!—what they’ve in turn taken away is the age-old cycle of utilization and sustainability.

And although the pomegranate & lemon verbena scented Dove Body Wash does smell amazing and makes shower time a true delight, what we often don’t think about while in the midst of that fruity and flowery mist are the chemical-riddled ingredients that we’re slathering all over our skin.

“I know it’s incredibly cliché to say,” said Kathleen when we met to talk soaps, “but your skin is your body’s largest organ…so shouldn’t we be directing just as much attention to what we’re putting on our bodies as we are about what we put in to it?

Touché, Kathleen. We hear you loud and clear.

Here at PRB we are all about providing our customers with foods that will nourish them from the inside out. We sell locally and responsibly raised meats that lack hormones and antibiotics; we refuse to sell anything that contains preservatives; and we only work with products and ingredients that we can both read easily and clearly pronounce.

Rainwater Farm feels the same.

“I’ve noticed that people have a pretty strong vocabulary around eating well, but that vocabulary and knowledge base isn’t quite as pronounced in the realm of body products and cosmetics,” Kathleen said, “but I think people know its something they should start thinking about.”

As a way to both hearken back to that traditional “pioneer method” of soap-making and to additionally fuel the cycle of sustainability and utilization, we’re excited to announce that Rainwater Farm is now using Porter Road Butcher tallow as a base for their soap.

PS – Tallow is the rendered kidney fat (which also known as suet) of a cow. Most commonly it is used in cooking (often for frying) and in soap-making.

Y’all, this is like, sustainability truly coming full circle. Mind. Blown.

Tallow-based soap is not only amazing for your skin, but to be able to use something that could otherwise be tossed in the trash and then to have that sustainable approach to what you use as a body product is something that we think is pretty f*cking cool.

Kathleen Souder began making soap when she was just eight years old in the kitchen of her mother’s home. A sibling among six others and a daughter of one aspiring soap-maker Colette Souder, Kathleen has memories of helping her mother stir and mix soaps in their Maryville home way back when. Today, decades later, she’s decided to return to her roots and is producing and selling her mother’s soaps in Nashville, while Colette keeps things going in Knoxville.

So while the business is growing, the need for supplies has (obviously) grown along with it.

“It solved a huge supply-chain problem for us, working with Porter Road Butcher Meat Co. We are going through thousands of pounds of tallow a year, and we were having trouble finding it. Now we have a source that is local and trustworthy, so we’re thrilled to have formed this partnership.”

Rainwater Farm makes their soap with a formulation that is considered “super-fatted” due to the higher ratio of fat to lye, which makes it even more nourishing for your skin. They use PRB tallow, olive oil, and coconut oil in the fat department, and the rest of the soap consists of other easily legible and familiar items: rainwater, sodium hydroxide (that’s the lye), and essential herbal oils.

So since these soaps fit with what we’re all about, and since one of the things that we’re all about is being clean (and since one of the things that James is all about is essential oils…yes, that’s for real), and of course since they’re using our tallow to make the stuff, we’re now proud to be selling Rainwater Farm Soaps at both Nashville shops!

Currently we have four varieties of soap—Orange Ginger, Summer Mint (with oatmeal!), Rosemary Mint, and Geranium—all of which smell delightful and come with adorable messages on the back from mama Colette. We’ll likely be expanding our soap collection as time goes by, so if there’s a certain variety you’re vying for, let us know!

Rainwater Farm additionally sells a variety of other products, from body washes to laundry soaps, which you can find at the 12 South Farmer’s Market in Sevier Park on Tuesdays (4:30 – 6:30 pm) and the East Nashville Farmer’s Market on Wednesdays at Shelby Park (3:30 – 7:00). Check out their full line of products at Rainwaterfarm.com or stay up to date with their whereabouts by following their Instagram @rainwater_farm

About Us

Porter Road Butcher is neighborhood butcher shop determined to provide Nashville with the highest quality products. We serve local, grass fed meats and other fine local and regional products. We hand cut all of our meats and make our products with fresh ingredients. Our goal at Porter Road Butcher is to make every one of our guests healthier and happier with fresh local products.

Locations

East Side

615-650-4440

501 Gallatin Avenue

Nashville, TN 37206

West Side

615-454-2995

4816 Charlotte Ave

Nashville, TN 37209

Porter Road Butcher

Sources

All of the meat from Porter Road Butcher comes from farms that are within two hours from the shop. Chris and James personally go to every farm and have made sure that each farm upholds the highest level of animal husbandry. Every farm associated with Port Road Butcher treats their animals, farm, and local environment with the upmost respect.

Cow

TN Grass Fed

Tennessee Grass Fed has been established as a family farm since 1837, but farmer Phil Baggett began the transformation towards grass-fed farming five years ago. TGF’s goal is to heal and improve the land while at the same time producing wholesome products of which they can be proud. They firmly believe that the animal protein portion of our diet should come from livestock that is raised on a natural diet of grass; not a diet containing added hormones or other additives. For beef, that means high-quality grass grown in open pastures. Therefore, being good stewards of both our land and the cattle we’re raising is essential. Using effective grazing management practices and the right combination of warm- and cool-season grasses requires less input of chemical fertilizers and fossil fuels, making it healthier. Furthermore, eliminating concentrated grains in feed further reduces our carbon footprint to well below that of traditionally finished cattle. We at TNGF were raised to believe our good name was the result of our behavior and how we treated people, so growing and selling our cattle locally supports our commitment to personal service and customer satisfaction.

KLD Farm

KLD Farm located in Ashland City, Tennessee is a farm with a focus true free-range farming for all of their animals. KLD, which stands for Ken and Lucy Drinnon, claims to have some of the most richly flavored natural grass-fed and grain-finished cows in Tennessee; yum. As a kid who grew up on a dairy farm, Ken decided at an early age that the farm life was not for him, so when it was time for him to fly the coup, he did so: far. Ken raised a family in Los Angeles, but as retirement neared he decided it was time to relocate closer to his family, and moved back to Tennessee in 1993. Since then he’s been raising cattle on his 82-acre farm where the cattle rotate from pastures and always have access to clean water, natural grasses and plenty of hay. Of course, they are never given any hormones, antibiotics, or steroids; only love from the entire Drinnon clan, all of whom pitch in around the farm. KLD’s beef is USDA inspected, 100% chemical free, and is aged for 14-18 days to enhance the delicious flavor.

Pig

D.B. Byler Amish Hog Farm

David Byler Amish Hog Farm is located in an Amish community in Ethridge, TN. David and his family raise pigs the only way they know how: the old fashioned way. The pigs are raised both on pasture and in the woods. They forage for many different kinds of nuts and tubers in their pasture and are given free range to roam about the farm and play like pigs should. David Byler and his family also grow corn to supplement the pig feed, which helps to fatten them up and make them extra delicious. David Byler raises these pigs from birth, keeping them happy and healthy by letting them live like pigs on his storybook Amish Farm.

Chicken

Jolly Barnyard

Jolly Barnyard is a small family farm located Ashland City, TN. Not only do the members of this family put their hearts and souls into raising these chicks, but they also find great joy and satisfaction from providing nutritional products to their community using a friendly and direct “producer-to-consumer” environment. All of their poultry is raised freely on pasture. They care for the chickens every morning by moving the coops to new fresh pastures, which ensures the birds always have fresh food available. The folks at Jolly Barnyard follow the Polyface Principles, which sits upon foundations of good stewardship of both the land and animals, complete transparency with all customers, and a focus on serving their community through healthy and delicious products. The poultry produced by Jolly Barnyard is flavored by the pasture and the natural forage from the chicken diet, which leads to incredibly tender and flavorful poultry.

Lamb

Tavalin Tails

Located about 35 minutes south of Nashville in College Grove, Tennessee, Tavalin Tails farm sits right in between the Harpeth River and one of Nashville’s leading organic produce growers, Delvin Farms. This 220 acre farm is home to some of the most spoiled-rotten sheep in Tennessee, claims owner Brandon Tavalin. Not only do Tavalin’s sheep graze on a beautiful open fields filled with the likes of clover, fescue, and oats, but they’re also lucky enough to have a heat “oasis,” situated under the trees that run along the riverbanks. The unique breed of sheep they raise, called Katahdin, is the only breed of hair sheep in the US that is bred specifically for producing delicious and high quality meat, so these animals spend their entire lives grazing, scratching, rooting, and roaming in the lush and humid Tennessee environment, just the way they were designed to. Akin to their organic neighbors, Tavalin is organic-minded as well: they use no pesticides, herbicides, chemical fertilizers, antibiotics or growth hormones, but instead strive to mimic nature by sticking to earth, water, minerals, compost, and careful management of the land and animals.

Eggs

Willow Farms

Willow Farm is a locally owned family farm in Summertown, Tennessee with a love and passion for both happy hens and pasture raised eggs. With the opportunity to roam from daylight to dark, all of Willow Farm’s hens are 100% free range, with access to as much fresh air, sunshine, green grass, bugs, and seeds as their little hearts desire. Their Rhode Island Red, Red Comet and White Leghorn hens live on upwards of 20 acres, giving them the opportunity to roam, forage, and eat plenty of fresh grass–their main diet staple. Willow Farm gives the highest quality of care to their hens, leading to an excellent quality egg with richly colored yolks, firm whites, and beautifully thick brown and white shells. Of course, they use absolutely no antibiotics or steroids on their flock, and their green pasture lacks any chemicals as well. Their temperate location allows for the hens to roam all year round, meaning delicious, healthy, and hearty eggs are available 12 months a year!

Dairy

Hatcher

For five generations, the Hatcher family has been farming in College Grove, TN. They are committed to their core values of faith, quality, cooperation, integrity and stewardship, which were handed down by their forefathers over 175 years ago and have since turned into valued traditions. Dairies in the Southeast have been decreasing in numbers rapidly over the last several years. It has become increasingly difficult to make a living in the dairy business due to rising input costs like fuel, fertilizer and feed, plus the pressure of encroaching development and suburbanization. Around 2005, the Hatcher Family decided to try something new and innovative as a way to keep dairy processing alive and profitable: their idea was to process and pasteurize their own milk. After tremendous community support, and plenty of planning and hard work, they had their store grand opening June 11th, 2007 and have been supplying us at Porter Road Butcher with the freshest and richest dairy every since we opened.

Cheese

Kenny’s Farmhouse

Kenny’s Farmhouse has raised milking cattle on their family’s 200-acre farm since the early 1990’s. In 1998 they began producing cheese as a way to add value to their products, and their production of cheesy deliciousness has increased every year since. At Kenny’s, they raise their cows with the absence of any hormones or antibiotics, and supplement their cattle’s pasture diet with corn and hay that is grown on their farm. Kenny’s Farmhouse produces all of their cheese by hand and on site in a modern cheese making facility, and we are proud to sell their delicious products at both our west and east locations.

The Bloomy Rind

Kathleen Cotter is the “Big Cheese,” of her cheese business The Bloomy Rind, but she’s better known in the culinary world as a cheesemonger. Unlike a cheese-maker, cheesemongers don’t actually make cheese but rather they deal in collecting and then selling cheeses, which is exactly what Kathleen does. With an emphasis on American artisan cheeses, she focuses on sourcing her products locally and regionally but also brings in cheeses from all over the country. In line with Porter Road’s mission and ideals, she sources her cheese exclusively from cheese-makers who pasture raise their animals, stray from antibiotics, and sustainably produce their products. You can find her and 40-50 of her delicious, cut-to-order cheeses at our East location, and about 8-12 varieties at our West shop.

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